Final Shooting Script

 

Video

Audio

1

Medium Shot (MS) Ext. Urban Brick House – DAY

We see a woman (Brenda) closing the door behind her as she enters the outdoors: it is raining, and we see a man (Dominick) sitting in the driver seat of a four-door Sedan.

V.O. (Brenda)

 

Dominick had family in Bittinger so we sold everything we owned, including our cleaning business, and left The Bronx in February 1988.  

2

Close Shot (CS) from within the Sedan; both Brenda and Dominick are peering out the passenger side window looking past the rain drops.

 

3

CS of a sign that READS: Welcome to Maryland

V.O. (Brenda)

I was a bit surprised when we arrived in Bittinger…

4

Wide Shot (WS) from within the car looking out; the landscape is jutted with mountainous terrain – lush green and wet from a constant, harsh rain.

V.O. (Brenda)

The landscape was different from what I was used to back home.  

5

CUT TO: Int. of a pizza shop that appears nicely organized with rows of light wooden tables and green cushion seats.

 

6

MS of the interior of the pizza parlor that sparsely fills with guests being seated at random tables

V.O. (Brenda)

We learned that there were only two places selling pizza in the area…

7

CS of a waiter serving PIZZA to a table of four

V.O. (Brenda)

The pizza was not what I was used to either; in New York you never get frozen pizza – you get fresh products.  

8

MS of the interior of the pizza parlor as guests happily dine and the wait staff busily takes orders and serves the guests

V.O. (Brenda)

And we badly wanted the special treat we had grown up with in our old neighborhood.

9

CS of a cook in the kitchen of the pizza parlor rolling and preparing pizza dough

V.O. (Brenda)

So, I opened a Pizzeria here in McHenry, Maryland in June 2001.

10

CS of the cook as he presses and flattens the pizza dough

V.O. (Brenda)

 

11

CS of the cook as he pours homemade pizza sauce over the dough

V.O. (Brenda)

And over the course of eight years I learned how to make consistently good pizza…

12

CS of the cook as he spreads cheese across the sauce

V.O. (Brenda)

and how to make dough from scratch using hard flour called durum.

13

CS of the cook as he places the pizza in the brick oven

V.O. (Brenda)

I also learned how to adjust the temperature so it would rise in every kind of weather…

14

CS of the cook as he lays out the pizza dough for the next order of pizza

V.O. (Brenda)

and how to stretch it by feel, and to turn the pizzas in our brick ovens so the crust would emerge crisp, firm and flavorful.

15

CS of the cook as he removes a fully cooked pizza; the cheese has melted to a savory blend topped with tomato and mushroom

V.O. (Brenda)

I also buy plum tomatoes from Italy because the soil provides a hint of acidity, and I use the lightest grade of Mozzarella and imported Romano cheeses.

16

CUT TO: Int. MS of the guests who are filling the tables at the pizza parlor

V.O. (Brenda)

I opened my restaurant in a beautiful new building in may 2004 with much thanks to those who helped me in my vision to sell quality pizza.

 

17

CS of Brenda who stands beside the bar of her thriving business

Brenda: Me and my staff pride ourselves on our friendliness and skill in cooking good food for friends…

 

18

MS of friendly wait staff who carry orders of pizza to their happily, waiting customers

Brenda: And we have the best customers – or I wouldn’t have survived in this business for so long…  

19

Long Shot (LS) of Brenda standing at the entrance of her pizzeria with the tables filled with guests affront Brenda

Brenda: and as long as there is a market for fresh ingredients for authentic New York style pizza – we will try our best to cater to that market.

20

CUT TO: Ext. WS of Brenda’s Pizzeria

V.O. (Brenda)

Now, my guests can enjoy the taste of fresh, homemade quality pizza just like I had in my old neighborhood.

21

Cont. Ext. WS of Brenda’s

Pizzeria

Logo and Tagline:

 

COME ENJOY NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA

AT BRENDA’S PIZZERIA

LOCATED AT DEEP CREEK LAKE

IN McHENRY, MARYLAND

 

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The Shooting Script: The Pizzeria

Tags

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Video

Audio

1

Medium Shot (MS) of a blue four-door Sedan on the road; it is raining.

 

2

Close Shot (CS) from within the Sedan; both Brenda and Dominick are peering out the passenger side window looking past the rain drops.

V.O. (Brenda)

I told Dominick I thought we were taking a trip into Baltimore, but he seemed to drive forever.

3

CS of a sign that READS: Welcome to Maryland

V.O. (Brenda)

I was a bit surprised when we arrived in Bittinger…

4

Wide Shot (WS) from within the car looking out; the landscape is jutted with mountainous terrain – lush green and wet from a constant, harsh rain.

V.O. (Brenda)

The landscape certainly was different from what I was used to back home in The Bronx.  

5

CUT TO: Int. of a pizza shop that appears nicely organized with rows of light wooden tables and green cushion seats.

V.O. (Brenda)

We were both tired and ravenous…

6

MS of the interior of the pizza parlor that is sparsely filled with guests seated at random tables

V.O. (Brenda)

And also surprised that there were only two places selling pizza in the area…

7

CS of a waiter serving PIZZA to a table of four

V.O. (Brenda)

The pizza was not what I was used to either; they only served pre-made products…

8

MS of the interior of the pizza parlor as guests happily dine and the wait staff busily takes orders and serves the guests

V.O. (Brenda)

But we wanted the special treat we had grown up with in our old neighborhood.

9

CS of a cook in the kitchen of the pizza parlor rolling and preparing pizza dough

V.O. (Brenda)

That’s when I had an idea; I’d dreamed of recreating the New York style pizza I had grown up with.

10

CS of the cook as he presses and flattens the pizza dough

V.O. (Brenda)

So, I started a pizza shop in McHenry, Maryland in June 2001.

11

CS of the cook as he pours homemade pizza sauce over the dough

V.O. (Brenda)

And over the course of eight years I learned how to make consistently good pizza…

12

CS of the cook as he spreads cheese across the sauce

V.O. (Brenda)

and how to make dough from scratch using hard flour called durum.

13

CS of the cook as he places the pizza in the brick oven

V.O. (Brenda)

I also learned how to adjust the temperature so it would rise in every kind of weather…

14

CS of the cook as he lays out the pizza dough for the next order of pizza

V.O. (Brenda)

and how to stretch it by feel, and to turn the pizzas in our brick ovens so the crust would emerge crisp, firm and flavorful.

15

CS of the cook as he removes a fully cooked pizza; the cheese has melted to a savory blend topped with tomato and mushroom

V.O. (Brenda)

I also buy plum tomatoes from Italy because the soil provides a hint of acidity, and I use the lightest grade of Mozzarella and imported Romano cheeses.

16

CUT TO: Int. MS of the guests who are filling the tables at the pizza parlor

V.O. (Brenda)

Now, we here at the Pizzeria are gratified to see all the people who visit the Deep Creek  lake in McHenry, and who take the opportunity to share what I had experienced back home. 

17

CS of Brenda who stands beside the bar of her thriving business

Brenda: I was able to recreate the neighborhood place I had grown up with, and I was honored to find such a beautiful place where to establish my business.  

18

MS of friendly wait staff who carry orders of pizza to their happily, waiting customers

Brenda: So, now, me and my staff pride ourselves on our friendliness and skill in cooking good food for friends…

19

Long Shot (LS) of Brenda standing at the entrance of her pizzeria with the tables filled with guests affront Brenda

Brenda: and as long as there is a market for fresh ingredients for authentic New York style pizza – we will try our best to cater to that market.

20

CUT TO: Ext. Brenda’s Pizzeria

V.O. (Brenda)

I opened my store in a beautiful new building in may 2004 with much thanks to those who helped me in my vision to sell quality pizza just as I had experienced back home in The Bronx.

21

WS of Deep Creek Lake

V.O. (Brenda)

Now, we are here to serve New York style pizza, overlooking the beautiful Deep Creek Lake located at McHenry, Maryland.

 

The Paper Edit

Video Audio
1 Close Shot (CS): CPT Y in a profile view during interview response CPT Y: A lot of times the Soldier had to step aside from himself and think of family. When they do need help, having an open door and a sharing ear, you know that you’ll be able to help them and you exhaust all possibilities. That’s our approach.
2 Continued close shot of CPT Y CPT Y: As far as soldiers being able to come to the Command, you have to really have an honest ear and an open heart to accept whatever they come with. Soldiers have some ego they want to keep held in private…

3 Medium Shot (MS) of CPT Z and CPT Y seated at the interview table facing one another CPT Z: Well, it’s just listening to the Soldier…

CPT Y: Right.

CPT Z: I think that’s part of the Army mentality; that you don’t want to ask for help. And I think as Commanders it’s important that we recognize those Soldiers that need help and try to break that barrier and let them know it’s okay to come forward and ask for help. And then have one of his front line leaders just ask him what’s going on, if there’s anything wrong.

4 CS of CPT Y as he responds to CPT Z CPT Y: There’s also an essence of vulnerability. Soldiers need to see that you’re human also; I may be a Commander, but I’m a man, I’m a husband, I’m a father, and I’ve made my fair share of mistakes and shortcomings. At the same time, someone was always there to help me.
5 CS of CPT Z as he speaks to CPT Y CPT Z: You just learn so much more just by being there and just talking to them. You just talk to them man-to-man and you learn a lot from your Soldiers when you do that.
6 MS of CPT Y in response to CPT Z CPT Y: Right. Soldiers are the heartbeat of that unit. And if that tends to skip a beat it’s going to show. Keeping them healthy is most important; so as much as possible, you want to open up all avenues to help every Soldier possible.
7 CS of CPT Z CPT Z: You’ve got to keep them both mentally and physically healthy; the physical part is usually the easiest way to keep them healthy. It’s the mental part, breaking through that barrier of, you know, “I’m a man. I’m in the Army. I don’t need help,” that’s the toughest part of keeping them mentally healthy.
8 MS of CPT Y and CPT Z as CPT Y leans forward in his chair CPT Y: It’s also a domino effect. Once one Soldier receives help, he’s willing to help another Soldier. So if they’re willing to reach out that hand to help each other, it becomes contagious.
9 CS of CPT Z CPT Z: And just being there with the Soldiers, it’s so much easier to find out what’s going on mentally with them. And you like going down on the line and hearing the Soldiers talk about other Soldiers that received help.
10 MS of CPT Y in response to CPT Z CPT Y: And that motivation is key to the spirit of the unit. We actually, as Commanders, live for our Soldiers as we do our own families. If one of my Soldiers is hurt I feel like it’s my own fault so we have to ensure that they have the basic necessities to keep them healthy and that’s where it starts, with motivation.
11 CS of CPT Z CPT Z: I’ve never seen a unit come together more than when a Soldier or a Soldier’s family needs help; it’s a great motivator to know that you’re helping one of your Soldiers. And when one of them is in trouble, we all come to their aid. And that’s how we make sure everybody is taken care of.
12 CS of CPT Y CPT Y: When a Soldier’s child has cancer anybody that has kids even if you don’t have kids, it sends something through you. I wouldn’t know what I’d be able to do without the love and support of my family especially my kids. That Soldier, in the same respect, is fighting with everything he has to keep his child motivated and not think about the possibilities of what could happen, but living and surviving. And then to be able to help that family I don’t see how you couldn’t do it.
13 MS of CPT Y and CPT Z CPT Z: If a Soldier takes that step to come ask for help through AER you know it’s legitimate and to break down that wall to come ask for help you know they need it at that time. I think once you get that Soldier through that wall it just opens the floodgates to let us be able to help him.
14 Continue MS of CPT Y and CPT Z CPT Y: And it’s amazing. If something as simple as a run, if a Soldier should fall behind that’s going to play on that Soldier’s psyche a lot. The same as if a Soldier needs help it’s going to play on his psyche a lot. With the balance of a strong and supportive unit a Soldier never needs to worry about that.
15 CS of CPT Z CPT Z: And that’s one of the great things about being in the Army. It doesn’t matter what other organization you’re in; if you’re working at Walmart, if you’re working at Microsoft or Pepsi, they’re not going to support you like the Army does. And I think a lot of the Soldiers know that they can come for help.
16 CS of CPT Y CPT Y: Right. You want to try to retain the Soldier for the quality of who they are as a person. I mean, once they receive help and once you’re able to help, that Soldier is going to be willing to dedicate himself more to the Army.
17 MS of CPT Y and CPT Z CPT Z: There’s no other employer in the world that will support its employees like the Army does. The Army is going to still pay you, and then you have the support of your unit that’s going to help you out.
18 Continue MS of CPT Y and CPT Z CPT Y: As an employee, there are duties done, and there’s a paycheck to be made. It’s also a culture – it’s just a culture that once you put this uniform on, that you’re part of a family. And it’s a grand scheme of taking care of each other, leaving no man behind.

CPT Z: And saying that, leave no man behind, it doesn’t just refer to when you’re on the battlefield. It refers to just as much when you’re back here at home station and your soldier needs help.
19 CS of CPT Y CPT Y: A Soldier is no good without his family. You do all that you can to support it.
20 CS of CPT Z CPT Z: And when you have a family that has, or any other Soldier that has a strong family, he’s going to come to work and he’s going to be willing to put in those extra hours because he knows his family is taken care of.
21 MS of CPT Y and CPT Z CPT Y: Just knowing the unit is there, it gives them a security that somebody is going to be there and they’ll share that with you if they know that you’re compassionate about helping them.
22 CS of CPT Z CPT Z: Once in command, I had 92 Soldiers that I took command of. But I also know that I had, with those 92 soldiers, about 50 or 55 families that came with it. And a good amount of my time is spent dealing with family members. And when you go into command you know that.
23 MS of CPT Y and CPT Z CPT Y: The essence of family is, you know, many different conglomerates of what we call family. And just being able to support that is – is great for us. It’s only going to make you that much better as a leader.

Shooting Script # 2: Ace Hardware

 

Video

Audio

1

Wide Shot (WS) of three Ace Hardware employees and one customer outside surrounded by a display of Ace Hardware supplies 

 

2

Medium Shot (MS) of customer approaching an Ace Hardware employee

Customer: Hey Laurie

 

Female Ace Employee: Hey Rod

 

Customer: How do you get your lawn… I don’t know… to stay green?

3

Close Shot (CS) of female Ace Hardware employee

Female Ace Employee: Paint

4

CS of customer reaction – perplexed

Female Ace Employee: I’m kidding follow me.

5

Long Shot (LS) of Ace Hardware business that is the front view of a large house with an Ace Hardware employee spraying the front yard with the garden hose

Male Ace Hardware Employee: Rod-man, how you doing?

 

Customer (Rod): Hey Jimmy.

6

MS of customer (Rod) and female Ace Hardware employee exiting the garage heading outside on the lawn

Female Ace Employee: First off make sure you’re not cutting the grass too short – it doesn’t let the roots grow.

7

MS of customer Rod and female Ace Hardware employee enter the back yard where another female Ace Hardware employee appears to be assembling a flamingo yard ornament

Ace Hardware Employee # 2: Hot-Rod, what’s up?

 

Customer Rod: Hi Nichole.

8

Back to a LS of three Ace Hardware employees working in the back yard of the Ace Hardware store – decorating with, and assembling yard supplies

Female Ace Employee: We also need fertilizer with weed control this time of year.

9

CS of a male Ace Hardware employee standing atop a ladder while hanging yard fixtures from the deck

Male Ace Employee # 1: The Rod-father…

 

 

10

CS of customer Rod as he points to the Ace employee as if they are best buddies

Customer Rod: Hey Tom.

11

MS of customer Rod approaching the storage shed with the female Ace Hardware employee

Female Ace Employee: I’m going to grab you a spreader.

12

CS of another male Ace employee who is smiling vibrantly

Male Ace Employee # 2: Hey… Rod… ster

13

CS of the female Ace Hardware employee who leans in close toward customer Rod

Female Ace Employee: He’s new.

 

Customer Rod: Oh.

14

Back to a CS of the new employee who stands before the employee on the ladder as they exchange glances

VO:

GETTING HELP AT ACE IS LIKE GOING TO YOUR NEIGHBOR.

15

WS of the Ace Hardware store house

VO (SINGING):

ACE IS THE PLACE WITH THE HELPFUL HARDWARE TOOLS.

 

 

Reference

            Ispot. TV. (2014). Ace Hardware TV Spot, Green Grass. Retrieved April 14, 2014 from http://www.ispot.tv/ad/7o5x/ace-hardware-green-grass

Shooting Script # 1: Almond Milk

 

Video

Audio

1

Medium Shot (MS) of a woman having breakfast – a carton of Silk Almond Milk is on the table along with a Almond Fictional Character that is standing beside the carton

 

2

Close Shot (CS) of the woman talking to the Almond fictional character

Woman: why would I use Silk, I mean I already use dairy milk…

 

Almond Character: Yeah… because there’s nothing like the taste of…

3

Close Up (CU) of Cow Utters

Cow: Moo

4

Back to a CS of woman sitting at the breakfast table

Woman: Ugh, I don’t want to think about that.

5

CS of Fictional Almond Character pushing a carton of Silk Almond milk across the kitchen table toward the woman

Almond Character: Then use Silk instead…

6

MS of woman at the table as the Almond Character pours almond milk into her cereal bowl

Almond Character: Almond and Vanilla tastes better than milk on cereal and it has fifty percent more calcium.

7

MS of woman with cereal spoon in hand sitting at the table

Woman: Really?

8

MS of woman with spoon in hand as almond character pours almond milk into her bowl

Almond Character: And it’s not squeezed from a…

9

CS of cow utters being squeezed for milk

Cow: Moo

10

CS of woman holding the carton of almond milk with a direct frontal view

Woman: Okay, alright…

11

MS of woman tasting her cereal with the Almond Milk

Almond Character: Any one of those reasons should be enough.

12

CS of woman chewing a bite of cereal

Woman: “Mmm”… that’s really good.

 

Almond Character: No?

13

MS of woman at the breakfast table

Woman: You are very smart.

14

MS of almond character standing beside a carton of Silk Almond Milk

Almond Character: Are you hitting on me?

15

MS of a carton of Silk Almond Milk and Silk Soy Milk with fictional almond character leaning against the carton aside a glass of milk: font reads Silk helps you bloom 

VO:

DELICIOUS DAIRY-FREE TASTE HELPS YOU BLOOM

Reference

            Ispot. TV. (2014). Silk Almond Milk TV Spot, Moo. Retrieved April 14, 2014 from http://www.ispot.tv/ad/7fiI/silk-almond-milk-moo

The Concept Paper# 2

The Focus
The focus of a digital media marketing plan for Brenda’s Pizzeria will utilize the various social media channels connected with the brand in order to promote the launch of a new campaign. The social media sites include:
Social Media
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Brendas-Pizzeria/45943842829
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrendasPizzeria
Foursquare: https://foursquare.com/v/brendas-pizzeria/4b773103f964a52067862ee3
The Main Website
The main website http://www.brendaspizzeria.com/pizzeria/index.html for Brenda’s Pizzeria hosts splendid photos and background content regarding the developing stages of the store that is located at Deep Creek Lake in McHenry, Maryland. The main website therefore serves as a viable host for a branding video – adding video content to enhance the brand experience.
The Issues
Brenda’s Pizzeria does not currently run advertising commercials across traditional media channels such as TV, radio or print (beyond the local magazine) and therefore cannot gain a significant audience from outside the local area. However, the pizza shops hosts excellent traditional New York style pizza from a native of New York; Brenda McDonnell is the owner of Brenda’s Pizzeria who originates from The Bronx in New York City according to her “Our Story” web page http://www.brendaspizzeria.com/pizzeria/index.html. After arriving in Maryland, Brenda learned that there were only two local pizza shops that served pre-made products according to Brenda and was therefore unlike the traditional New York style pizza she had grown to love. Hence, “an idea was born” Brands explains – and from the story of Brenda’s Pizzeria a creation myth can be born; the drive to Maryland was treacherous and they arrived ravenous from their journey from New York that began the process of developing a New York style Pizzeria – at the lake house.
The Audience
The audience for Brenda’s Pizzeria can captivate and invigorate the local crowd to the in-season tourists of Deep Creek Lake – Brenda’s offers New York style pizza in a friendly personally-established business that treats all guests to her freshly-made pizzas; “I learned to make dough from scratch using durum (hard) flour” says Brenda “and to adjust the temperature so it would rise consistently in every kind of weather” – and with respect to her local audience Brenda explains “we were gratified to see the people here appreciated our efforts to share what we had experienced in our former home.”
The Content Points
Brenda’s Pizzeria enhances traditional New York style pizza with a house specialty – the chicken roll – that comprises of breaded chicken & mozzarella cheese wrapped in Brenda’s homemade dough. “Homemade freshness can be found at Brenda’s Pizzeria.”

The Brand
Brenda McDonnell brought the Traditional New York Style pizza to the lake house – and refined her brand with freshly-made homemade dough and specialty items that can only be found on the Brenda’s Pizzeria menu.

The Concept Paper # 1

The Focus
The focus of a rebranding video for client company Reebok will strategically use all available online media to launch a new branding campaign to include the following:
Social Media
The Reebok company can be found on social media websites to include Facebook and Twitter and has an active status with Google +. The social media websites allows for the company to interact and communicate with its audience; the rebranding campaign can therefore be viewed and discussed by the Reebok consumer or audience.
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/reebok
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/reebok
Google +: http://www.plus.google.com/+Reebok
The Reebok Website
Website: http://www.reebok.com
The official website features an attractive display of digital graphics that hosts its products to include shoes, apparel and accessories. Their selections include men’s, women’s, kid’s items, sports and classic.

The Issues
Global Market Share

The total market share graph displays the retail values of the Reebok brand compared with the competitors of its category in the athletic shoe and apparel products. The lead competitor Nike ranks the highest of its category with a range of 31 to 39% total market share based on retail sales in the US. Reebok however rates closely with the “other” competitors of the 22.2% margin with a range of 14.2 to 15.2% market share value. Nike leads its category by nearly half the market share total value. Therefore, a rebranding campaign will be used to re-position the brand in the minds of the consumers to encourage positive ROI and conversion rates.

The Audience
The consumer market for the Reebok brand consists of youth (teens and pre-teens), Children (ages 4 to 10) and infants and toddlers. The shoes and apparel lines can be worn by men, women, kids, infants and toddlers and the special features products appeal to a consumer demographic of physically active adult men and women as well as active children who can benefit from wearing performance shoes and clothing.
The Content Points
A Historical Approach
Reebok was founded by Joseph William Foster in 1890 (Adidas Group) when he added spikes to running shoes that enhanced performance speed. JW Foster began his company and later in 1924 his shoes appeared at the Olympics. In 1958 his grandsons developed the Reebok Company and acquired rights to sell the brand in the US by 1979. Reebok International Limited has been a subsidiary of the German company Adidas since 2005 according to writers Ross-Sorkin, Andrew and J. Feder, Barnaby for The New York Times (2005).
The Brand
The Reebok Company has a substantially long history since its first development in 1890 and its first major appearance at the 1924 Olympic Games. The Reebok Company faces intense competition from the Nike brand but maintains its status as a recognizable brand of athletic products. The songbird for the Reebok Company is – Reebok is Fitness.

References
Adidas Group. (2013). Our History. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from http://careers.adidas-group.com/reebok/brand-history.aspx
Google Images. (2013). Athletic Footwear – Global Market Share. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from http://www.google.com/imgres?sa=X&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&rlz=1I7MXGB_enUS544&biw=1280&bih=521&tbm=isch&tbnid=Ie8MVl47VbwnPM:&imgrefurl=http://blogs.ubc.ca/erictoh/2012/10/14/do-mergers-work/&docid=VRSSZ6U2MjFRdM&imgurl=http://blogs.ubc.ca/erictoh/files/2012/10/400px-Footwear_market_shares1.png&w=400&h=304&ei=oNBnUqSWOYXfkQfDzYHQBw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=975&vpy=23&dur=10500&hovh=196&hovw=258&tx=129&ty=101&page=1&tbnh=139&tbnw=190&start=0&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:5,s:0,i:96
Ross – Sorkin, Andrew and J. Feder, Barnaby. (2005, August 3). Adidas agrees to acquire Reebok in $3.8 billion deal. The New York Times. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/03/business/03cnd-shoe.html?_r=0

Creating the Story

Tags

This week’s lesson focuses on “the persuasive power of the branding video” as defined by the P.I. Reed School of Journalism (2014). The objective of this week’s lesson is to find 3 commercials that are not literal by creative choice – that doesn’t show the product in the body of the feature. But instead, the advertisement segment illustrates a creative attempt to branding that is accomplished through story that can be revealed through catchphrase and positioning statement or “attitude.”

The first commercial selected is that of AT&T’s commercial segment titled “cutest grape” which can be found via this URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ijeg-jeTUBs that depicts an average-aged man who is seated at a round table within a setting that can be gathered to be a kindergarten classroom; there are four children seated around the gentleman who asks the question “why is it better to get what you want now instead of later?” An approximately 5-year-old girl responds “because you don’t want to wait to eat your raisins.” The YouTube commercial segment has a total running time of 29 seconds and is not literal by creative content. The man ends his conversation with the little girl by stating “that’s adorable.” The end tag then features the logo for the AT&T Company along with a voice-over of the catchphrase “It’s not complicated.” The commercial segment depicts a subtle story of a character, being the kindergarten student, who responds to the man’s question with the knowledge that she has – she ascertains that you cannot wait to eat a raisin because it might turn into a grape and the tagline “that’s adorable” becomes appropriate and engaging for the viewer. The AT&T logo is however not visible during the erring of the commercial segment which makes for the commercial to appeal to an audience through humorous creative content rather than literal advertising.

The second commercial segment is Duracell’s “Trust Your Power” feature that can be viewed via this URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdRrP1Kh9TU that features NFL’s linebacker Patrick Willis of the San Francisco 49ers who is telling his story. The NFL player is looking back at his life, depicted as a child who is thinking while alone in his room; the video then cuts to a shot of an adult who is running – “running towards something” or “running away from it” – he’s not sure, but he ascertains that you cannot let anything hold you back because “you find it in yourself – you can go anywhere you want to be.” The 1:59 minute commercial segment is not literal in creative choice but is instead viewed as the story of an athlete who can remember being a child once – and that child can remember wondering what he could become. The story concludes with the catchphrase “trust the power within” followed by the logo and name of the brand: Duracell. The brand however is never featured during the body of the commercial. The relevancy of “a battery” to the “power within” is engaging and effective for delivering a message that is not literal in content.

The third commercial segment selected is that of Cadillac’s “poolside commercial” that can be found via the URL: http://theinspirationroom.com/daily/2014/cadillac-divides-viewers-with-poolside-commercial/ which features a man who stands by the pool while he relates to the viewer audience with direct eye contact. His rhetoric is positioned to address the “American public” regarding why he or she spends so much time at work asking “why do we work so hard” then answering his own question he explains “you work hard and create your own look” – “believe anything is possible.” The 1:02 minute commercial segment only introduces the Cadillac logo as an end segment that features “The first ever ELR” vehicle model. The commercial is not created to be literal or to initially sell the American audience a Cadillac but to first sell the viewer on a principle: the American works hard so he or she can own a Cadillac “creating your own look.” The commercial therefore sells the viewer on the fact that if he or she works hard then he or she can be rewarded with a luxury car – the Cadillac.

In short, the selected television commercials are not literal in creative choice but instead comprise of a story narrative that is used to first sell “motivation,” “a principle” or a “humorous fact” before the segment attempts to sell a brand. In effect, the story captivates the audience long before the viewer realizes the ad is selling a product or service. The brand positioning statement has been highlighted in bold for each commercial; as “Adult Freedom” is positioned for Las Vegas – the brand positioning statements are unique to each commercial. The three referenced brands have selected to employ a marketing strategy that is developed through narrative rather than direct advertising content.